Stop Lights 2.0? They’re coming…

Recently ​I’ve been devoting a lot of energy to further developing my ideas on traffic into something that administrators and bureaucrats can not only wrap their minds around, but can get excited about endorsing – needless to say, an extremely daunting task to get anyone to listen. Even after drafting a petition to the City of Raleigh to do something about bringing traffic into the 20th century, the response has been tepid on that end. So I decided that if Raleigh – recently the much-touted City of the Future – isn’t interested in embracing a truly futuristic concept, I’d try my luck on a broader audience to see if ANY cities would benefit. Below the petition are various articles of the impending changes – anyone who likes to stay tech savvy already knows the automakers are on a mad scramble to implement drive-by-wire technologies. What shocks me is I’m not seeing any municipalities trying to do the same, although Google did pull up a few older articles of things in the works.

Here’s a concept I recently hit upon that’s raised a few pairs of eyebrows. It’s an extension of the Stoplight Alert concept that could potentially save lives (maybe even someone you care about).

Please forgive the scenarios’ strain on believability, but I wrote this to make a point and wasn’t terribly concerned about artistic merit…

Scenario 1: Your child has injured himself in such a way that makes it imperative to get him to the ER asap, and you could get him to a hospital in half the time it takes an ambulance to make the round trip. So you rush him to the hospital, unaware of the police car that just clocked your speed at 30 miles over the speed limit. The officer (fresh from the academy) pulls you to the curb, takes his time getting out of the cruiser and – uncaring of your son’s condition – after spending a few minutes lecturing you about the law, strolls back and spends 10 minutes writing your ticket. The need for urgency has passed as your child died while you were waiting for the officer to finish writing the ticket.

Scenario 2: Your child has injured himself in such a way that makes it imperative to get him to the ER asap, and you could get him to a hospital in half the time it takes an ambulance to make the round trip. You pull out your cell phone, activate the 911 Express app, which dials 911 and immediately sends your gps coordinates to the dispatcher. The dispatch gets enough information to determine the nearest hospital best equipped to handle the situation (if applicable) and transmits a priority code to all stop lights and alert any police cars approaching the area. You arrive at the hospital unimpeded in just enough time for the team waiting to take over, having been alerted to your impending arrival. Your child makes a full recovery and lives to see his next birthday.

Thanks for reading and your comments/tweets/shares!

~ by hockart on January 28, 2013.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: